Thursday 29 February, 2024
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Lynx IFV production to begin in Hungary

German defence company Rheinmetall has officially opened its new armoured vehicle factory in Zalaegerszeg, Hungary. The factory, which covers an area of 20,000 square meters, will produce the Lynx KF41 infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) for the Hungarian Armed Forces and other potential customers.

The Lynx KF41 is a state-of-the-art IFV that offers high mobility, protection, firepower and adaptability. It can carry up to nine soldiers and is equipped with a Lance 2.0 turret that features a 35mm automatic cannon, a 7.62mm coaxial machine gun, anti-tank guided missiles and a secondary weapon station. The Lynx KF41 can also be configured for different roles such as command and control, reconnaissance, repair and recovery, and ambulance.

The opening ceremony of the factory was attended by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán, Minister of Defence Tibor Benkő, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Péter Szijjártó, and Rheinmetall CEO Armin Papperger. Orbán praised the strategic partnership between Hungary and Rheinmetall, saying that it will strengthen the country’s defence capabilities and create hundreds of new jobs. Papperger said that the factory is a milestone for Rheinmetall’s international growth strategy and expressed his confidence in the Lynx KF41 as a competitive product in the global market.

The factory is part of a €2 billion contract signed in 2020 between Hungary and Rheinmetall for the delivery of 218 Lynx KF41 vehicles and related services. The contract also includes the establishment of a joint venture company, Rheinmetall Hungary Zrt., which will oversee the production, maintenance and support of the vehicles. The first batch of Lynx KF41 vehicles is expected to be delivered to the Hungarian Armed Forces by 2023.

News Desk
News Desk
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