Sunday 25 February, 2024
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BAE Systems to restart M777 production

BAE Systems has signed an agreement with the US Army to produce M777 lightweight 155mm howitzer structures, paving the way for the weapon’s production line to be restarted.

BAE Systems, the UK’s largest defence contractor, has announced that it will resume production of parts for the M777 howitzer, to meet the increasing demand from the US Army. The M777’s performance in Ukraine has resulted in a surge in demand for it and BAE has reported a significant rise in interest in the weapon system from countries across Europe, Asia, and the Americas.

The company has signed a preliminary agreement worth $50mn with the US Army to begin a new programme while the final details of a broader contract are being worked out. The resurgence in government interest in bolstering arsenals and the war in Ukraine is reviving dormant production lines.

“This restart of production of the major structures for the U.S. Army’s M777s comes at a critical time, with howitzers deployed on operations in Ukraine. The U.S., as well as Canada and Australia, has donated M777s to Ukraine. We understand that they are performing well and we are very proud of our role in supporting our allies”, said John Borton, vice president and general manager of BAE Systems Weapons Systems UK.

“The M777 will remain at the forefront of artillery technology well into the future through the use of technical insertions, long-range precision guided munition developments, and flexible mobility options.”

The M777 Lightweight Towed 155mm Howitzer provides a rapid reaction capability and is a proven system that delivers decisive firepower when needed most in sustained combat conditions. With more than 1,250 M777s in service with ground forces in the United States, Ukraine, the Americas, Australia and India, the M777 is the only battle-proven 155mm lightweight howitzer in the world.

Neil Ritchie
Neil Ritchie
Neil Ritchie is the founder and editor of DefenceToday.com. Neil is also the editor of other online publications covering military history, defence and security. He can be found on Twitter: @NeilRitchie86.

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